littlemimi:

( video Jay Park featured in NY1)

Korean-American recording artist Jay Park not only has millions of fans across Asia and is also developing a following in the United States, particularly in New York. NY1’s Lewis Dodley filed this report as part of Asian-American Heritage Week.

He’s a singer, dancer and rapper but his fans say that still doesn’t begin to describe Jay Park’s talent.

The 25-year-old Korean-American phenom has millions of fans across Asia. But if you want proof of his popularity in New York, look no further than a line for his recent concert in Midtown that wound around the corner and stretched for several blocks 8 hours before the show.

“I guess I’m a really dedicated Jay Park fan,” said one fan who waited for over 24 hours for tickets. “I don’t want to take the chance that anyone else got those front-row seats. I’m making sure I’m here first.”

“He’s like a triple threat,” said another fan. “I love him. And I love his tattoos too. They’re really nice.

“He’s such a good dancer and a good singer and he has a great personality,” said another. “I like his personality.”

“I speak both English and Korean,” Park said. “I’m writing songs in both English and Korean. I do rap, I dance, I sing. I do a whole bunch of things. I just feel like I’m a whole new breed of artist.”

The road wasn’t easy for Park. After a tumultuous break-up with the Korean group 2 p.m., Park re-emerged on the internet with a cover of the BoB and Bruno Mars hit “Nothing on You,” which he sung in his parents’ bathroom. It got 2 million YouTube hits in less than a day, setting the stage for his return to Korea.

“You sense that there’s a little something deeper, which I think we want as an American audience and what Korean-Americans want to see from their pop stars,” said Minya Oh of Miss Info. “They want to see behind the gloss.”

Now, Park is among a growing list of Asian-American entertainers like Far East Movement, who topped the Billboard charts for a while and Aziatics, who are driven by the catchy raps of Queens native Flowsik.

Park is taking off with his his primarily Korean CD “New Breed,” with an English CD to follow. Park says that if mainstream success comes, it’ll just happen.

“I was born in the States,” he said. “I grew up listening to hip-hop and R&B in the States. When I make music, it’s what comes out naturally.”

kpop-hot-pot:

Ad for Jay’s concert at times square ^^

(Source: all-night-till-infinity)

  1. Camera: HTC ADR6400L
  2. Focal Length: 4mm

Verizon APAHM Tour 2012 ft. JAY PARK - TOUR ANNOUNCEMENT (by VerizonAPAHMtour)

speaksoftlyandcarrybigstick:

Pro Basketball’s First Asian-American Player Looks At Lin, And Applauds
Linsanity is buzzing through the sports world, as New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin has come off the bench to emerge as a star. The unlikely story of an NBA player of Taiwanese descent who attended Harvard — and who, at 6 feet 3 inches, outscored Kobe Bryant to beat the Lakers — has won him many admirers.
There aren’t many players like Lin. But in Utah, there’s a man who knows something about what he’s experiencing. Like Lin, Wat (for Wataru) Misaka is an Asian-American who became an unlikely star and played basketball for the Knicks. But he did it in the 1940s.
That was after two trips to national title games, including one played in Madison Square Garden — also the Knicks’ home court.
“For some reason, the crowd was really rooting for me,” Misaka, 88, tells Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep of that tournament. “New Yorkers are known to root for underdogs. I think that was the reason. Here was an underdog team, from out in the sticks in Utah.”
“They liked the team, and they cheered for me, which was refreshing,” he says. “Because it was right after the war. And there didn’t seem to be people holding that against my ancestors.”
But World War II had already had an effect on Misaka’s teenage years. That was the era of internment camps, when many people of Japanese descent were forced to live in confined areas, some of them in desolate and remote parts of the western United States.
“That was the real strange part of it,” Misaka says. “At the time that they were being taken from their homes, and being put into these camps in early 1942, I was playing basketball at Weber State, which is in my home town of Ogden.”
Then he moved on to play for Utah.
“It was a real strange experience,” he says, “to be free — not without prejudice, but free — and playing the game I loved in my home state, while others were being treated like criminals.”
Misaka had interrupted his college career to serve two years in the U.S. Army’s intelligence services division during the occupation of Japan. Then he returned to Utah and made a name for himself. The Knicks drafted the 5-foot-7-inch guard/forward, but his pro career lasted only a few games.
When the Knicks cut him from the team, Misaka went back to Utah to work as an engineer; he’s lived there ever since. And that’s where he watched on TV as Lin lit it up against the Utah Jazz, when he made his first start. In that game on Feb. 6, Lin had 28 points and 8 assists.
“In fact, my brother called me when the game was in progress,” Misaka says. So he watched it — and then watched it again.
“He is quite an amazing player,” Misaka says. “Just like everyone else, I was really surprised at the skills that he had.”
As for Lin’s game, Misaka says the guard “is fairly tall — 6’3 is a good size for a point guard. But he has the speed to make that pick and roll work, and work well. It seems like he has the skill, and the know-how, to really take advantage of any lapses on the defense.”
Misaka says he eventually got in touch with Lin, to offer his encouragement to the young player.
“From now on, I can sit back as one of his thousands of fans,” he says, “and see what happens next.”
If you hadn’t heard of Misaka before now, don’t feel too bad about it. He says he’s never been one to trumpet his early success on the court — even to his son and daughter, who live near him in Utah.
“I never did talk much about sports to the kids. I had this notion that I didn’t want them to be saddled with any kind of pressure, and so on,” he says. “In fact, my daughter was in college, I think, when she found out that I had played basketball in my collegiate days.”
To be exact, Misaka did more than play. He won an NIT title by beating one of Adolph Rupp’s Kentucky teams, in 1947. And it’s important to recall that in those days, it was the NIT, not the NCAA tournament, that was the gold standard.
Misaka’s path to stardom was strikingly similar to Lin’s. As a 2010 article in Sports Illustrated noted, Misaka “was thrust into the lineup when the Utes’ center—their captain, best athlete and leading scorer—went down with a sprained ankle on the eve of the postseason.”
But unlike Lin, Misaka never got a chance to start for the Knicks.
“I really didn’t play many minutes,” he says. He later added, “I never did think of myself as a pioneer.”
Misaka returned to New York to visit Madison Square Garden in 2009, after a documentary about his playing days, and his status as the nation’s first non-Caucasian player in the pros, came out. The film was titled Transcending.
speaksoftlyandcarrybigstick:

Pro Basketball’s First Asian-American Player Looks At Lin, And Applauds
Linsanity is buzzing through the sports world, as New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin has come off the bench to emerge as a star. The unlikely story of an NBA player of Taiwanese descent who attended Harvard — and who, at 6 feet 3 inches, outscored Kobe Bryant to beat the Lakers — has won him many admirers.
There aren’t many players like Lin. But in Utah, there’s a man who knows something about what he’s experiencing. Like Lin, Wat (for Wataru) Misaka is an Asian-American who became an unlikely star and played basketball for the Knicks. But he did it in the 1940s.
That was after two trips to national title games, including one played in Madison Square Garden — also the Knicks’ home court.
“For some reason, the crowd was really rooting for me,” Misaka, 88, tells Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep of that tournament. “New Yorkers are known to root for underdogs. I think that was the reason. Here was an underdog team, from out in the sticks in Utah.”
“They liked the team, and they cheered for me, which was refreshing,” he says. “Because it was right after the war. And there didn’t seem to be people holding that against my ancestors.”
But World War II had already had an effect on Misaka’s teenage years. That was the era of internment camps, when many people of Japanese descent were forced to live in confined areas, some of them in desolate and remote parts of the western United States.
“That was the real strange part of it,” Misaka says. “At the time that they were being taken from their homes, and being put into these camps in early 1942, I was playing basketball at Weber State, which is in my home town of Ogden.”
Then he moved on to play for Utah.
“It was a real strange experience,” he says, “to be free — not without prejudice, but free — and playing the game I loved in my home state, while others were being treated like criminals.”
Misaka had interrupted his college career to serve two years in the U.S. Army’s intelligence services division during the occupation of Japan. Then he returned to Utah and made a name for himself. The Knicks drafted the 5-foot-7-inch guard/forward, but his pro career lasted only a few games.
When the Knicks cut him from the team, Misaka went back to Utah to work as an engineer; he’s lived there ever since. And that’s where he watched on TV as Lin lit it up against the Utah Jazz, when he made his first start. In that game on Feb. 6, Lin had 28 points and 8 assists.
“In fact, my brother called me when the game was in progress,” Misaka says. So he watched it — and then watched it again.
“He is quite an amazing player,” Misaka says. “Just like everyone else, I was really surprised at the skills that he had.”
As for Lin’s game, Misaka says the guard “is fairly tall — 6’3 is a good size for a point guard. But he has the speed to make that pick and roll work, and work well. It seems like he has the skill, and the know-how, to really take advantage of any lapses on the defense.”
Misaka says he eventually got in touch with Lin, to offer his encouragement to the young player.
“From now on, I can sit back as one of his thousands of fans,” he says, “and see what happens next.”
If you hadn’t heard of Misaka before now, don’t feel too bad about it. He says he’s never been one to trumpet his early success on the court — even to his son and daughter, who live near him in Utah.
“I never did talk much about sports to the kids. I had this notion that I didn’t want them to be saddled with any kind of pressure, and so on,” he says. “In fact, my daughter was in college, I think, when she found out that I had played basketball in my collegiate days.”
To be exact, Misaka did more than play. He won an NIT title by beating one of Adolph Rupp’s Kentucky teams, in 1947. And it’s important to recall that in those days, it was the NIT, not the NCAA tournament, that was the gold standard.
Misaka’s path to stardom was strikingly similar to Lin’s. As a 2010 article in Sports Illustrated noted, Misaka “was thrust into the lineup when the Utes’ center—their captain, best athlete and leading scorer—went down with a sprained ankle on the eve of the postseason.”
But unlike Lin, Misaka never got a chance to start for the Knicks.
“I really didn’t play many minutes,” he says. He later added, “I never did think of myself as a pioneer.”
Misaka returned to New York to visit Madison Square Garden in 2009, after a documentary about his playing days, and his status as the nation’s first non-Caucasian player in the pros, came out. The film was titled Transcending.

speaksoftlyandcarrybigstick:

Pro Basketball’s First Asian-American Player Looks At Lin, And Applauds

Linsanity is buzzing through the sports world, as New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin has come off the bench to emerge as a star. The unlikely story of an NBA player of Taiwanese descent who attended Harvard — and who, at 6 feet 3 inches, outscored Kobe Bryant to beat the Lakers — has won him many admirers.

There aren’t many players like Lin. But in Utah, there’s a man who knows something about what he’s experiencing. Like Lin, Wat (for Wataru) Misaka is an Asian-American who became an unlikely star and played basketball for the Knicks. But he did it in the 1940s.

That was after two trips to national title games, including one played in Madison Square Garden — also the Knicks’ home court.

“For some reason, the crowd was really rooting for me,” Misaka, 88, tells Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep of that tournament. “New Yorkers are known to root for underdogs. I think that was the reason. Here was an underdog team, from out in the sticks in Utah.”

“They liked the team, and they cheered for me, which was refreshing,” he says. “Because it was right after the war. And there didn’t seem to be people holding that against my ancestors.”

But World War II had already had an effect on Misaka’s teenage years. That was the era of internment camps, when many people of Japanese descent were forced to live in confined areas, some of them in desolate and remote parts of the western United States.

“That was the real strange part of it,” Misaka says. “At the time that they were being taken from their homes, and being put into these camps in early 1942, I was playing basketball at Weber State, which is in my home town of Ogden.”

Then he moved on to play for Utah.

“It was a real strange experience,” he says, “to be free — not without prejudice, but free — and playing the game I loved in my home state, while others were being treated like criminals.”

Misaka had interrupted his college career to serve two years in the U.S. Army’s intelligence services division during the occupation of Japan. Then he returned to Utah and made a name for himself. The Knicks drafted the 5-foot-7-inch guard/forward, but his pro career lasted only a few games.

When the Knicks cut him from the team, Misaka went back to Utah to work as an engineer; he’s lived there ever since. And that’s where he watched on TV as Lin lit it up against the Utah Jazz, when he made his first start. In that game on Feb. 6, Lin had 28 points and 8 assists.

“In fact, my brother called me when the game was in progress,” Misaka says. So he watched it — and then watched it again.

“He is quite an amazing player,” Misaka says. “Just like everyone else, I was really surprised at the skills that he had.”

As for Lin’s game, Misaka says the guard “is fairly tall — 6’3 is a good size for a point guard. But he has the speed to make that pick and roll work, and work well. It seems like he has the skill, and the know-how, to really take advantage of any lapses on the defense.”

Misaka says he eventually got in touch with Lin, to offer his encouragement to the young player.

“From now on, I can sit back as one of his thousands of fans,” he says, “and see what happens next.”

If you hadn’t heard of Misaka before now, don’t feel too bad about it. He says he’s never been one to trumpet his early success on the court — even to his son and daughter, who live near him in Utah.

“I never did talk much about sports to the kids. I had this notion that I didn’t want them to be saddled with any kind of pressure, and so on,” he says. “In fact, my daughter was in college, I think, when she found out that I had played basketball in my collegiate days.”

To be exact, Misaka did more than play. He won an NIT title by beating one of Adolph Rupp’s Kentucky teams, in 1947. And it’s important to recall that in those days, it was the NIT, not the NCAA tournament, that was the gold standard.

Misaka’s path to stardom was strikingly similar to Lin’s. As a 2010 article in Sports Illustrated noted, Misaka “was thrust into the lineup when the Utes’ center—their captain, best athlete and leading scorer—went down with a sprained ankle on the eve of the postseason.”

But unlike Lin, Misaka never got a chance to start for the Knicks.

“I really didn’t play many minutes,” he says. He later added, “I never did think of myself as a pioneer.”

Misaka returned to New York to visit Madison Square Garden in 2009, after a documentary about his playing days, and his status as the nation’s first non-Caucasian player in the pros, came out. The film was titled Transcending.

What a whirlwind week. He really proved against my Lakers that he’s real. Probably the happiest Laker lost for me because Jeremy Lin and his Knicks won. It’s really amazing to witness The Jeremy Lin Show. You can’t not love him and his journey. It really is contagious and inspiring. God really does work wonders and Lin’s journey proves it.

-lailanieg

pauldateh:

Minhee, a recent customer at the Papa John’s Pizza location on 3477 Broadway in New York City, was given this receipt for her transaction. As you can see, an employee took the liberty of renaming her “lady chinky eyes.” 

An employee who, no doubt, will soon be out of a job. 

Conveniently, the restaurant’s contact information is right there on the receipt. If you’ve got a moment, free to give them a call (212-368-7272) to discuss topics like pizza, customer service and racial mockery.

Between this and the Chick-Fil-A “ching” and “chong” incident, I’m going to have to start examining my fast food receipts more carefully.

UPDATE: The Huffington Post and NY Daily News have picked up on this. 

The Papa John’s store owner blames the teenage employee’s behavior on “modern culture,” whatever that means, and says he plans to have “sensitivity trainings” to avoid situations like this in the future. That’s it? Meanwhile, the employee who called a customer a “chink” remains on the payroll?

via angryasianman

the fact that the employee hasn’t been fired is fucking outrageous. the store owner should be ashamed of himself.

bitchville:

Tribute of Light for 9/11
A team of 30 electricians worked through the night yesterday to prepare  for the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks which takes  place on Sunday. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is made up of 88 bulbs which  project two blue beacons of light up into the heavens that is visible  from a 60 mile radius. The tribute will be powered on for the entire day  and night on Sunday to remember the 2,753 people who died on September  11, 2001. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is also scheduled to open on Sunday at the WTC site.
bitchville:

Tribute of Light for 9/11
A team of 30 electricians worked through the night yesterday to prepare  for the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks which takes  place on Sunday. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is made up of 88 bulbs which  project two blue beacons of light up into the heavens that is visible  from a 60 mile radius. The tribute will be powered on for the entire day  and night on Sunday to remember the 2,753 people who died on September  11, 2001. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is also scheduled to open on Sunday at the WTC site.
bitchville:

Tribute of Light for 9/11
A team of 30 electricians worked through the night yesterday to prepare  for the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks which takes  place on Sunday. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is made up of 88 bulbs which  project two blue beacons of light up into the heavens that is visible  from a 60 mile radius. The tribute will be powered on for the entire day  and night on Sunday to remember the 2,753 people who died on September  11, 2001. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is also scheduled to open on Sunday at the WTC site.
bitchville:

Tribute of Light for 9/11
A team of 30 electricians worked through the night yesterday to prepare  for the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks which takes  place on Sunday. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is made up of 88 bulbs which  project two blue beacons of light up into the heavens that is visible  from a 60 mile radius. The tribute will be powered on for the entire day  and night on Sunday to remember the 2,753 people who died on September  11, 2001. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is also scheduled to open on Sunday at the WTC site.
bitchville:

Tribute of Light for 9/11
A team of 30 electricians worked through the night yesterday to prepare  for the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks which takes  place on Sunday. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is made up of 88 bulbs which  project two blue beacons of light up into the heavens that is visible  from a 60 mile radius. The tribute will be powered on for the entire day  and night on Sunday to remember the 2,753 people who died on September  11, 2001. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is also scheduled to open on Sunday at the WTC site.

bitchville:

Tribute of Light for 9/11

A team of 30 electricians worked through the night yesterday to prepare for the 10th anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks which takes place on Sunday. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is made up of 88 bulbs which project two blue beacons of light up into the heavens that is visible from a 60 mile radius. The tribute will be powered on for the entire day and night on Sunday to remember the 2,753 people who died on September 11, 2001. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum is also scheduled to open on Sunday at the WTC site.

Remember 9/11. Remember those who lost their lives and prayers to their families. Live life with purpose.

9/11 Lighters Remix (by BrookLawKid)